Friday, June 7, 2013

An Earth-Shattering Zombie Plot Hole Discovery

I love zombies.

I love zombie movies, zombie shows, zombie jokes, traffic signs that are hacked to warn of a zombie apocalypse - you name it. It's all awesome.

We have recently started watching The Walking Dead on Amazon. We like to watch shows late, because we can watch straight through. Also, lots of things are free this way. So don't tell me anything - we are still in Season 2.

Anyway, in one of those life-changing moments of clarity last week, the Other pointed out a huge flaw in zombie logic after a particularly gruesome and depressing Walking Dead episode.

Here's the gist of it.

Every time you see a zombie attack on Walking Dead, Zombieland, etc., the zombies EAT the victim. They don't bite them and then leave them to scamper off into the woods with a few infected zombie bites - they EAT them. There's nothing left to turn into a zombie.

So, where do zombies come from? Someone needs to do the zombie birds and beasts talk!! I'm so alarmed that now I feel uncertain about the zombie timeline! I have been preparing for the zombie apocalypse so diligently, assembling my team carefully with my friend Kim - we totally thought we were ready. I even have special zombie bullets!

And now this.

I'm sure you can imagine how stressful this is.

I need someone to reassure me that I've just overlooked something in the hundreds of hours of film we've viewed.

In the meantime, to distract myself from an uncertain future, I've been stamping!

I made this card for two challenges today - the new Mix-Ability challenge, which is to smudge on your project, and tonight's red, white and blue VSN challenge.

For my smudging, I just used my finger and Whisper White craft ink to make the clouds behind my bird. I colored him with Inktense pencils and my Aquapainter, and then I added Crystal Effects on top. The orange panel is a Gelli print scrap, under an Apothecary Accents die cut left over from my class last weekend.


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Normally, I would do a patriotic card for a red, white and blue challenge, but when I looked up how Vermilions really look in real life, I couldn't resist a non-traditional approach.

Now please, reassure me about the zombies.

Loveyameanitbye.

8 comments:

  1. Nah, this isn't really a hole.

    First, zombies in all these shows occur during some sort of apocalypse, therein many, many zombies are made at once.

    Second, zombies are easily distracted - anytime something crosses their path, they go after it.

    Third, zombies never go after other zombies; only living flesh will do.

    Fourth, you don't turn (in most canons) immediately - it takes time after a bite/exposure to turn.

    Fifth, there is evidence in later episodes of the Walking Dead of zombies actually getting *full* too but still wanting to bite.

    So think this way... During an apocalypse, people don't really know what's going on, and there are more people than zombies. Thus, someone gets attacked, but they are likely able to beat the zombie away, or others help. Of course, now they are infected, and eventually turn, likely biting others. Zombie A, who is not fully eaten.

    Now get into the later stages, when there are many zombies and still a lot of people. People are getting attacked, and pulled to the ground to get chewed upon. However, while eating, some fresh, live people run past and munching zombie is distracted by fresh meat, and abandons his kill for better stock. Zombie B, not fully eaten.

    This also comes in the case when someone turns very quickly - zombies don't eat other zombies. I would imagine at a very fast stage, these people start to taste bad after death, and the munching zombies move on. Zombie C - not fully eaten.

    In order to have the kind of mass turns you see in these stories, it has to all be happening very fast, so a lot of people were turned very quickly. Thus, lots of people who either got bitten during a skirmish, ran off to hide and eventually turned (Zombie D not fully eaten), or got partially eaten and were subsequently abandoned by their attackers (see above).

    [Note: there's an additional reason I can't tell you about since you're not into season three yet.]

    If you notice in Walking Dead, there are many people in varying stages of munch. Bicycle Girl, for one wasn't very lucky and there is a webisode with her backstory. There are plenty of bodies around that were just too far gone to turn as well. And there are even examples of people entirely disappearing because they were munched COMPLETELY, so you probably just don't see all the victims.

    Not everyone ended up as a zombie. Even with just 80% of the population of the US getting completely eaten with no trace and say, 5% survival rate, this still leaves the 15M survivors with 46M partly-eaten zombies to deal with. I'd wager the 80% is high too. So worry yourself no more. It's not a plot hole!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Nah, this isn't really a hole.

    First, zombies in all these shows occur during some sort of apocalypse, therein many, many zombies are made at once.

    Second, zombies are easily distracted - anytime something crosses their path, they go after it.

    Third, zombies never go after other zombies; only living flesh will do.

    Fourth, you don't turn (in most canons) immediately - it takes time after a bite/exposure to turn.

    Fifth, there is evidence in later episodes of the Walking Dead of zombies actually getting *full* too but still wanting to bite.

    So think this way... During an apocalypse, people don't really know what's going on, and there are more people than zombies. Thus, someone gets attacked, but they are likely able to beat the zombie away, or others help. Of course, now they are infected, and eventually turn, likely biting others. Zombie A, who is not fully eaten.

    Now get into the later stages, when there are many zombies and still a lot of people. People are getting attacked, and pulled to the ground to get chewed upon. However, while eating, some fresh, live people run past and munching zombie is distracted by fresh meat, and abandons his kill for better stock. Zombie B, not fully eaten.

    This also comes in the case when someone turns very quickly - zombies don't eat other zombies. I would imagine at a very fast stage, these people start to taste bad after death, and the munching zombies move on. Zombie C - not fully eaten.

    In order to have the kind of mass turns you see in these stories, it has to all be happening very fast, so a lot of people were turned very quickly. Thus, lots of people who either got bitten during a skirmish, ran off to hide and eventually turned (Zombie D not fully eaten), or got partially eaten and were subsequently abandoned by their attackers (see above).

    [Note: there's an additional reason I can't tell you about since you're not into season three yet.]

    If you notice in Walking Dead, there are many people in varying stages of munch. Bicycle Girl, for one wasn't very lucky and there is a webisode with her backstory. There are plenty of bodies around that were just too far gone to turn as well. And there are even examples of people entirely disappearing because they were munched COMPLETELY, so you probably just don't see all the victims.

    Not everyone ended up as a zombie. Even with just 80% of the population of the US getting completely eaten with no trace and say, 5% survival rate, this still leaves the 15M survivors with 46M partly-eaten zombies to deal with. I'd wager the 80% is high too. So worry yourself no more. It's not a plot hole!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nah, this isn't really a hole.

    First, zombies in all these shows occur during some sort of apocalypse, therein many, many zombies are made at once.

    Second, zombies are easily distracted - anytime something crosses their path, they go after it.

    Third, zombies never go after other zombies; only living flesh will do.

    Fourth, you don't turn (in most canons) immediately - it takes time after a bite/exposure to turn.

    Fifth, there is evidence in later episodes of the Walking Dead of zombies actually getting *full* too but still wanting to bite.

    So think this way... During an apocalypse, people don't really know what's going on, and there are more people than zombies. Thus, someone gets attacked, but they are likely able to beat the zombie away, or others help. Of course, now they are infected, and eventually turn, likely biting others. Zombie A, who is not fully eaten.

    Now get into the later stages, when there are many zombies and still a lot of people. People are getting attacked, and pulled to the ground to get chewed upon. However, while eating, some fresh, live people run past and munching zombie is distracted by fresh meat, and abandons his kill for better stock. Zombie B, not fully eaten.

    This also comes in the case when someone turns very quickly - zombies don't eat other zombies. I would imagine at a very fast stage, these people start to taste bad after death, and the munching zombies move on. Zombie C - not fully eaten.

    In order to have the kind of mass turns you see in these stories, it has to all be happening very fast, so a lot of people were turned very quickly. Thus, lots of people who either got bitten during a skirmish, ran off to hide and eventually turned (Zombie D not fully eaten), or got partially eaten and were subsequently abandoned by their attackers (see above).

    [Note: there's an additional reason I can't tell you about since you're not into season three yet.]

    If you notice in Walking Dead, there are many people in varying stages of munch. Bicycle Girl, for one wasn't very lucky and there is a webisode with her backstory. There are plenty of bodies around that were just too far gone to turn as well. And there are even examples of people entirely disappearing because they were munched COMPLETELY, so you probably just don't see all the victims.

    Not everyone ended up as a zombie. Even with just 80% of the population of the US getting completely eaten with no trace and say, 5% survival rate, this still leaves the 15M survivors with 46M partly-eaten zombies to deal with. I'd wager the 80% is high too. So worry yourself no more. It's not a plot hole!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hmmmm - Hawaii was vegetated by bird poo - perhaps Zombie poo???

    ReplyDelete
  5. I don't want to give any spoilers but I did ask my hubby if he remembered Season 2 of TWD and basically that will give you the best explanation at the end.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Love your card! All that gorgeous colour & that Apothecary accents die is stunning too. The new 'baby' zombies always seem to be escapees: they get bitten & then get away before they get eaten. heehee :o)

    ReplyDelete
  7. I don't think they started out feasting on humans. It was just a bite and move on in the beginning. Only when they started getting HUNGRY did they eat, eat, eat.
    Is Talking Dead also available to watch? If so you definetly need to watch that too. Almost (but not quite) better than the actual show!!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Bwahahahaha! You are a hoot! All valid questions to which I have no answers due to feeling like a corpse so not sure how the dead actually walk, let alone run and boy when my teeth all fall out of my head I hope I can still chow on some meat like they do!

    ReplyDelete

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